Commentary

The Montréal economy has faced more than its fair share of challenges over the past 10-plus years. First, there was the terrorist attack of September 2001, which posed serious challenges to the city's aerospace industry and its overall manufacturing sector. The latter was plagued by security issues following the attack, as the United States tightened its borders considerably, making it much more difficult for Canadian exports to make their way to the United States. Read more...

Building and strengthening infrastructure is a wise investment for all levels of government. Beginning with the Building Canada Plan in 2007, Canada has seen a sizable increase in federal infrastructure investments. The $33 billion Building Canada Plan provided the first long-term, stable federal funding program to support provincial, territorial, and municipal infrastructure projects, recognizing that over 95 percent of Canada's core public infrastructure is owned by sub-national governments. Read more...

Featured Research Articles

According to Gallup's new 142-country study on the State of the Global Workplace, only 13% of employees worldwide are engaged at work. In other words, about one in eight workers - roughly 180 million employees in the countries studied - are psychologically committed to their jobs and likely to be making positive contributions to their organizations. The bulk of employees worldwide - 63% - are "not engaged," meaning they lack motivation and are less likely to invest discretionary effort in organizational goals or outcomes. And 24% are "actively disengaged," indicating they are unhappy and unproductive at work and liable to spread negativity to coworkers. In rough numbers, this translates into 900 million not engaged and 340 million actively disengaged workers around the globe Read more...

From 1995 to 2004, the internet hosted static, one-way websites; these were places to visit passively, retrieve information from, and perhaps post comments about by electronic mail. This Web 1.0 was about getting people connected, even if its applications were largely proprietary and only displayed information their owners wished to publish. Today, Web 2.0 enables many-to-many connections in countless domains of interest and practice. People are connected and expect the internet to be user-centric. They generate content, business intelligence, reviews and opinions, products, networks of contacts, statements on the value of web pages, connectivity, and expressions of taste and emotion that search engines, not portals, fetch. Read more...

Communication is a very important part of our daily lives. To some, it means communicating with family and friends, and to others it means promoting your business and communicating with your customers. As a politician, it's a vehicle in which I provide my constituents with an opportunity to ask questions and receive updates on what's happening in our community. It also allows me to be in touch and on top of events in my city, my province, and indeed the world. During the Egyptian Arab Spring, I was communicating in real time with folks in Tahrir Square as events were unfolding. That same night I was responding to a question from a constituent asking how long a local construction project would take and when the road would be open again to traffic. Social media strengthens the politician's ability to engage with constituents-whether social media is used effectively or not determines whether that engagement is a positive or negative experience for the constituent. Read more...